Eatable Mushrooms And Their Kinds

All You Need to Know About Fungi And How to Define Them

Shiitake

What do we know about mushrooms? Not much. A common person can only tell the difference between champignons and porcini fungi whereas multiple other kinds of healthy foodstuff exist!

They are easy to cook and simple to store in the fridge. More than that, fungi are a rich source of vitamins and other beneficial elements.

 Adding these vegetables (yes, they are lumped in the veggie category!) to various dishes, you will make your meals more aromatic and delicious without any effort.

So what makes mushrooms so nutritious?

  1. They contain antioxidants that protect us from free radicals. It means that eating fungi will prevent heart issues, cancer, aging, and boost our immune system!
  2. Fungi have beta-glucan that is beneficial for heart health and keeps the cholesterol level balanced.
  3. They are loaded with B vitamins.
  4. Having fungi in our daily meals provides us with copper and potassium. These elements make our bones and muscles stronger and healthier, besides, potassium improves the nerve function.

Let’s see now what fungi we can find on the store shelves to enjoy at home!

Related: How Long Do Mushrooms Last In The Fridge?

White button fungus

It has a mild taste and it’s flavored less intensively. It can be consumed both fresh and cooked.

White button fungus
Photo by Chris Gentile

Crimini

Firm and flavorous fungus which is a baby portobello.

Crimini
photo by Mike Lorrig

Portobello

Thick and rich, they fit macaroni and sauces wonderfully.

Portobello
photo by epicurious.com

Shiitake

Add an intense woody flavor to cooking with these Japanese fungi!

Shiitake
photo by Grant Cornett

Maitake

These ones have an earthy aroma that will make well-known foods taste new.

Maitake
photo by epicurious.com

Oyster fungus

Perfect for soups and stir-fries.

Oyster fungus
photo by epicurious.com

Enoki

Typical Japanese fungi, they are grown in the wild and are good when consumed uncooked.

Enoki
photo by epicurious.com

Beech fungi

Perfect for frying becoming crunchy and nutty-sweet!

Beech fungi
photo by epicurious.com

King Trumpet Fungus

Cook their thick and meaty stems since that’s what is worth trying!

King Trumpet Fungus
photo by Romulo Yanes

Chanterelle 

With the apricot scent, these fungi will enrich any dish.

Chanterelle
photo by epicurious.com

Porcini 

With the taste that reminds sourdough and has both creamy and nutty notes, these fungi are one of the favorites in Italian cuisine

Porcini
porcini by grocycle.com

Hedgehog fungi

These funny things taste sweet and somewhat nut-like, and, if cooked correctly, they’ll become super crunchy!

Hedgehog fungi
hedgehog fungus by grocycle.com

Chicken of the Woods

Sounds (and looks) weird but this fungus is a perfect poultry substitute since it tastes exactly like chicken!

Chicken of the Woods
chicken of the woods by grocycle.com

Black trumpet

Though these fungi don’t look much attractive, they are known for a rich smoky flavor that reminds of black truffle when mushrooms dry.

Black trumpet
black trumpet by grocycle.com

Wood Blewit

Though edible, these fungi might lead to allergy in some people even when cooked.

Wood Blewit
wood blewit by grocycle.com

Morels

With the meaty texture, they have an earthy and slightly nut-like flavor and still very tender.

Morels
morels by grocycle.com

Shimeji

Another Japanese fungus, shimeji fungi are bitter when raw but they’ll enrich the flavor of any dish you add them to.

Shimeji
shimeji by grocycle.com

Lion’s mane fungus

Looks funny but it’s very healthy and tastes like crab meat.

Lion’s mane fungus
lion’s mane fungi by grocycle.com

Giant Puffball Mushroom

They can weight around 20 kg when fully grown but for cooking, we pick them small.

Giant Puffball Mushroom
giant puffball fungus by grocycle.com

Matsutake

Very rare but so tasty! 

Matsutake
matsutake by grocycle.com

As you know, fungi can be wild and grown cultivated. If the latter ones are fine to consume since they were checked for safety, wild fungi must be treated with care and caution. Unless you’re a pro at mushroom-picking and know all of them perfectly, don’t risk and better buy these delicious veggies in a shop.

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